Paper Town by John Green – A Review

By Aamna Ali
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In this issue, we touch on young adult writers through a book review by 13-year old Aamna Ali. She studies in Canadian International School. Aamna loves books; she enjoys reading fiction book especially dystopian novels. She also writes short fiction stories. Besides reading she loves music and movies, she is particularly fond of scary movies.

I am a huge fan of John Green’s books, and especially of Paper Towns; it is one of my favorite books. What makes it so interesting and different is not only the amazing metaphors used throughout the story by the author, but also how likeable and witty all the characters are. The story is mysterious, thought-provoking and funny all at the same time! Both the story and characters keep you hooked to every page, and each turned page brings with it new surprises

The next day Margo suddenly disappears. Quentin believes Margo has left clues for him to find her, and sets out on his own adventure looking for her. The story turns into an exciting journey to find the real Margo, because nobody seems to know who she really was. The interesting clues and unexpected twists that Quentin faces keeps the reader completely absorbed in the book.

 

John Green’s writing style takes all his books to a whole new level. The metaphors he uses are genuine and complex. Perhaps this is why John Green is one of the best young adult fiction authors of today. He won the 2006 Printz Award for his novel, Looking for Alaska, and his book, The Fault in Our Stars, topped the New York Best Seller List. In 2014, John Green was included in Time Magazine’s list of 100 Most Influential People in the World.

 

Paper Town revolves around Quentin Jacobsen, the average teenage boy, who believes his only miracle in life is Margo Roth Spiegelman. They are complete opposites; Quentin is a band geek while Margo is adventurous. She runs away from home, plays pranks, and likes leaving clues wherever she goes – like the time she broke into Universal Studios or when she ran away to the circus.  

 

One night, Margo shows up at Quentin’s window asking for his car, and thus, their adventure begins. He drives Margo around Jefferson Park, helping her as she thanks her real friends and punishes her fake ones.

John Green is an amazing storyteller who knows how to create characters that are real. The crazy eccentric personalities of the characters make the book so much fun to read. Every character is different yet they gel really well in the story. As a reader you feel connected to them, and you’re able to picture them clearly in your head because John Green has an amazing talent of making characters pop out from his books. He creates a clear picture of each one of them, so it feels like we know these people. Each character adds humour to the book.

 

The whole concept of the story is captivating; it looks deep into how people over-estimate each other, in good ways and bad. The story gives a great message about how people should be careful not to judge others. Margo was seen as this precious miracle that nobody knew much about. The story does not only take you on a journey to find out where Margo ran off to, it takes you on a journey to find who Margo really is.

 

“That’s always seemed so ridiculous to me, that people would want to be around someone because they’re pretty. It’s like picking your breakfast cereals based on colour instead of taste.”

 

I also love the way this book is full of suspense, yet has extremely funny moments, at which you cannot help but laugh out loud. The combination of Margo’s sarcasm and Quentin’s awkwardness makes this book a real joy to read.

 

It is amazing how John Green’s books transcend all age groups. Whether 13 years old or 35 years old, you will love this deep and perceptive story, which will take you on an exciting ride to find Margo, both spiritually and physically.

 

It is a must-read for any John Green fan, and a great book for these summer vacations since the movie is ready for release at the end of July.

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About Aamna Ali

13-year old Aamna Ali studies in Canadian International School. Aamna loves books; she enjoys reading fiction book especially dystopian novels. She also writes short fiction stories. Besides reading she loves music and movies, she is particularly fond of scary movies.