Chalay Thay Saath – A FUCHSIA Review

By Sohail Javed
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So, the internet is rife with reasons NOT to watch Chalay Thay Saath. The film that was splashed all over media, social and otherwise, in the weeks leading up to its release on 21 April 2017 had audiences tingling in anticipation of a treat of amazing scenery, fresh cast, fabulous story and cinematography. Somehow, audiences weren’t walking out of cinemas feeling as great as they were walking in. The Express Tribune called it a “beautifully bad film” while Dawn claims it “fell apart” like the “mountain it’ll take you to”. 
Since anyone and everyone is going to tell you about how slow the pace of the film is, how poorly developed its plot is and how shallow the characters seemed, FUCHSIA (being FUCHSIA) found someone who actually didn’t hate it. Let’s hear from Sohail Javed, what he thought was “wrong” with Chalay Thay Saath.
“Finally got the tickets … the house was packed. Now, here is everything that was wrong with the movie – message for the team that made it. 
It was honestnever do that; you need to lie.
The branding was controlled – wrong again. 
It was not wannabe-Bollywood; it was original stuff that reminded me of quality screenplays like Unkahi and Tanhaiyaan days. Terrible.
 
The production design, grade, post, make-up and costumes were all
apt: a clear no-no again.
No dances, item numbers, cleavage or cheap jokes how unoriginal.
 
The director tried to be original, and he succeeded how dare he?
The background score held everything together – terrible again.
Every actor remained in character and gave his/her best – what crap.

The director of photography got it spot on and helped the director weave a beautiful film – useless, huh.

Pure, clean, humble Pakistani film made with honesty and heart – now, who wants to watch this kind of stuff?”
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About Sohail Javed

One of Pakistan's leading video directors, Sohail Javed has come a long way. Well known for the movie Mera Pehla Pyaar (2012), Javed's work has left a mark on the Pakistani pop music industry, and inspired a new generation of video directors. The very first Indus Drama Awards (2005) recognized his talent. He also won Lux Style's Best Music Video Director Award in 2010 for Chal Rein Day by Sajjad Ali.